Home page2019-05-17T16:14:00+00:00
Southport Beach, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Keeping
The promise
of Clean Coastal Waters
in Long Island Sound

Nitrogen pollution threatens our way of life, but we can fix it.

Nitrogen pollution in coastal waters of Long Island Sound is reaching a tipping point. The longer we wait to fix it, the harder and costlier it will be. The Nature Conservancy has developed this website to provide the information, tools and resources coastal communities need to restore and protect clean, healthy waters – now and for future generations.

Milford, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Nature Can't Wait
And Neither Can We

Our Approach

Cladophora Mat, Eastern CT © J. Vaudrey, UCONN

The Problem and Sources

Nitrogen pollution from wastewater and fertilizers is a growing threat in our waters.

Branford, CT © Vaudrey Lab, UCONN

Impacts and Threats

Excess nitrogen in coastal waters puts public health and communities at risk.

Building Inspector and Septic System © iStock Purchased Standard License

Fixing the Problem

We’ve made great progress cleaning up the Sound, but there is more to be done.

Wastewater Technician © Shutterstock, Purchased, Standard License

Comparing Solutions

Scientists and engineers have proven approaches for restoring water quality.

Saugatuck River, Westport, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC

Planning and Guidance

Identify actions, steps and resources to help safeguard clean and healthy waters.

Waterford, CT © D. Gumbart, TNC

Citizen Actions

Everyone depends on clean water – we can all do our part to restore and protect it.

New nitrogen fertilizer texture may reduce nitrate levels, make water safer

Phys.org- May 16, 2019

Since the mid-1920s, the deposits of nitrogen into land has more than doubled, leading to higher levels of nitrate in water resources. Researchers say new nitrogen fertilizer texture may reduce nitrate levels, make water safer.

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Isotopes Help Trace the Origin of Urban Water Pollution in Mauritius

Africa News- May 15, 2019

In Mauritius, an island off the southeast coast of Africa, scientists are using isotopes to track down sources of pollution contributing to toxic algal blooms and fish kills to improve policies and practices for healthier water.

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Meet the ‘Oyster Wench’—a single mom fighting pollution with the power of clams and kelp

Popular Science- May 14, 2019

Puckett, 36, known locally as “Oyster Wench,” a single mother with two young children, lives on Block Island, about a dozen miles off the Rhode Island coast. She represents a new generation of ocean farmers, one whose singular connection to the water is coupled with a passion for the environment.

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