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Southport Beach, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Keeping
The promise
of Clean Coastal Waters
in Long Island Sound

Nitrogen pollution threatens our way of life, but we can fix it.

Nitrogen pollution in coastal waters of Long Island Sound is reaching a tipping point. The longer we wait to fix it, the harder and costlier it will be. The Nature Conservancy has developed this website to provide the information, tools and resources coastal communities need to restore and protect clean, healthy waters – now and for future generations.

Milford, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Nature Can't Wait
And Neither Can We

Our Approach

Cladophora Mat, Eastern CT © J. Vaudrey, UCONN

The Problem and Sources

Nitrogen pollution from wastewater and fertilizers is a growing threat in our waters.

Branford, CT © Vaudrey Lab, UCONN

Impacts and Threats

Excess nitrogen in coastal waters puts public health and communities at risk.

Building Inspector and Septic System © iStock Purchased Standard License

Fixing the Problem

We’ve made great progress cleaning up the Sound, but there is more to be done.

Wastewater Technician © Shutterstock, Purchased, Standard License

Comparing Solutions

Scientists and engineers have proven approaches for restoring water quality.

Saugatuck River, Westport, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC

Planning and Guidance

Identify actions, steps and resources to help safeguard clean and healthy waters.

Waterford, CT © D. Gumbart, TNC

Citizen Actions

Everyone depends on clean water – we can all do our part to restore and protect it.

Press Release: Crucial LI Sound Research Receives Funding

Stony Brook- February 11, 2019

More than $1.5 million in funding has been awarded for four research projects looking into ecological issues in the Long Island Sound (LIS) and its watershed. The funding will be administered by New York Sea Grant (NYSG) at Stony Brook University.

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Research casts doubt on EPA drinking water standard

Grist- January 29, 2019

More than 5 million Americans get their drinking water from public water systems that could contain hazardous levels of a chemical called nitrate, which is linked to public health risks — including cancer and birth defects. And the concentrations found in the vast majority of that drinking water would be deemed safe by the Environmental Protection Agency, according to a study published this month in the journal Environmental Health.

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A new way to curb nitrogen pollution: Regulate fertilizer producers, not just farmers

Green Biz- January 25, 2019

Nitrogen pollution is produced by a number of interlinked compounds, from ammonia to nitrous oxide. While they have both natural and human sources, the latter increased dramatically over the past century as farmers scaled up food production in response to population growth. Once these chemicals are released into the air and water, they contribute to problems that include climate change and “dead zones” in rivers, lakes and coastal areas.

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