Home page2019-06-20T19:44:05+00:00
Southport Beach, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Keeping
The promise
of Clean Coastal Waters
in Long Island Sound

Nitrogen pollution threatens our way of life, but we can fix it.

Nitrogen pollution in coastal waters of Long Island Sound is reaching a tipping point. The longer we wait to fix it, the harder and costlier it will be. The Nature Conservancy has developed this website to provide the information, tools and resources coastal communities need to restore and protect clean, healthy waters – now and for future generations.

Milford, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC
Nature Can't Wait
And Neither Can We

Our Approach

Cladophora Mat, Eastern CT © J. Vaudrey, UCONN

The Problem and Sources

Nitrogen pollution from wastewater and fertilizers is a growing threat in our waters.

Branford, CT © Vaudrey Lab, UCONN

Impacts and Threats

Excess nitrogen in coastal waters puts public health and communities at risk.

Building Inspector and Septic System © iStock Purchased Standard License

Fixing the Problem

We’ve made great progress cleaning up the Sound, but there is more to be done.

Wastewater Technician © Shutterstock, Purchased, Standard License

Comparing Solutions

Scientists and engineers have proven approaches for restoring water quality.

Saugatuck River, Westport, CT © R. Lowenthal, TNC

Planning and Guidance

Identify actions, steps and resources to help safeguard clean and healthy waters.

Waterford, CT © D. Gumbart, TNC

Citizen Actions

Everyone depends on clean water – we can all do our part to restore and protect it.

Massive 8,000-mile ‘dead zone’ could be one of the gulf’s largest

National Geographic- June 10, 2019

Record-breaking Midwest rainfall washed tons of fertilizer and sewage water out to sea, contributing to a devastatingly large patch of polluted water, scientists say.

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Failed septic systems polluting Meriden reservoir

Record Journal- June 6, 2019

Kenmere Reservoir, a city water supply located two miles north of the city’s boundary in Berlin, has been contaminated by nutrients seeping out of failed septic systems of two vacant residential homes located next to the reservoir. The city of Meriden is considering purchasing the two homes.

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Special Report: Septic tanks leak nitrogen into Florida’s springs

The Daytona Beach News-Journal- June 6, 2019

Long-time Floridians mourn for the springs of their youth, with crystal clear water, abundant eel grass, fish and crustaceans swimming in the springs. Today, the springs are often clouded, plants are sparse or covered with green slimy algae, and there are fewer fish and other marine life.

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